Skip to content

Library

  • Telemedicine is the act of practicing medicine from a distance and your appointment will be conducted by a licensed veterinarian. Before your appointment, gather information on your pet’s history and your current concern. Look at a calendar and write down a timeline of your pet’s problems. Be prepared to answer questions that you would normally be asked at an in-person appointment. Write notes to help you remember everything. Most telemedicine appointments involve the use of some type of video chat. Conduct your visit in a quiet area with good lighting and have your pet with you before the call starts. Not all concerns can be addressed through telemedicine. If your veterinarian is unable to arrive at a diagnosis via telemedicine, he or she can help you determine the next step for your pet to ensure that he or she receives optimal care.

  • Having your pet properly prepared for a blood test helps to ensure that the results are as accurate and reliable as possible. Preparation for these two types of tests is slightly different. Your veterinarian will give you specific instructions before your appointment. It is important that you follow these instructions exactly to ensure accurate test results.

  • Gout is a disease in which the metabolism of uric acid is defective. Uric acid is a breakdown product of nitrogen, formed when protein is metabolized in the body. Uric acid is the form in which reptiles excrete their nitrogen wastes.

  • Dystocia (difficult birth or egg binding) happens when the female reptile is unable to pass her eggs or fetus. It is a reasonably common problem in reptiles and can be life threatening. It is a problem seen with snakes, turtles and lizards. It is caused by a variety of factors.

  • The Colubridae comprises the largest family of snakes, with over one thousand species. The vast majority are harmless, although they can bite. Some colubrids are small insectivorous species while others can be larger (constrictor snakes such the racer and the indigo snake).

  • Boas are a group of medium to large sized, non-venomous snakes found in South and Central America, Madagascar, Papua and the Pacific Islands. Pythons are a group of non-venomous snakes found in Africa, Asia and Australia. Some members of this family are amongst the largest snakes in the world.

  • You should try to provide the biggest cage possible. The type of cage you set up must be appropriate for the specific needs of the different species. Smaller species or juvenile snakes often do well in a 10 or 20 gallon aquarium, or even a plastic container (cut small air holes!).

  • Snakes have several unique problems and understanding these problems will allow you to better care for your pet and minimize future health care problems.

  • Sulfadiazine/trimethoprim is given by mouth in the form of a liquid suspension or is given by injection in the hospital, and it is commonly used to treat bacterial and parasitic infections, sometimes off label, in dogs, cats, small mammals and other exotics. Common side effects include a decreased appetite, vomiting, and diarrhea, although more serious side effects are possible such as dry eye, or liver, blood, or urinary problems. Do not use in pets that have severe liver damage, blood cell problems, dehydration, or sulfa allergies. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.

  • Sulfadimethoxine is an antimicrobial given by mouth in the form of a tablet or liquid suspension, used primarily to treat coccidiosis. Its use for treating small mammals and reptiles is off label. Common side effects include vomiting, diarrhea, and decreased appetite. This medication should not be used in pets that are allergic to it, pregnant, lactating, or have severe liver or kidney dysfunction. If a negative reaction occurs, please call your veterinary office.